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Bullae

Bullae are large blisters on the skin that are filled with clear fluid. Many different skin conditions can cause bullae to form. They can be caused by infection or inflammation of the skin.

References

Habif TP. Principles of diagnosis and anatomy. In: Habif TP, ed. Clinical Dermatology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 1.

Habif TP. Vesicular and bullous diseases. In: Habif TP, ed. Clinical Dermatology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 16.

  • Bullous pemphigoid - close-up of tense blisters

    Bullous pemphigoid - close-up of tense blisters - illustration

    Pemphigus is classified as one of the blistering diseases. These is a close-up picture of typical lesions. Very small blisters are called vesicles. Larger blisters, like these, are called bullae.

    Bullous pemphigoid - close-up of tense blisters

    illustration

  • Poison ivy on the knee

    Poison ivy on the knee - illustration

    This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the knee. These early lesions consist of multiple small blisters (vesicles), often in a line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The person may then spread the toxin to other areas of the body by scratching.

    Poison ivy on the knee

    illustration

  • Poison ivy on the leg

    Poison ivy on the leg - illustration

    This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the leg. These early lesions consist of multiple small blisters, often in a line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The rash is caused by skin contact with the oily sap (resin) of these plants. The oily resin usually enters the skin rapidly, and is seldom transferred from person to person. The rash is not caused by the fluid from the blisters. Thus, once the person has washed the oil off the skin, the rash is usually not contagious.

    Poison ivy on the leg

    illustration

    • Bullous pemphigoid - close-up of tense blisters

      Bullous pemphigoid - close-up of tense blisters - illustration

      Pemphigus is classified as one of the blistering diseases. These is a close-up picture of typical lesions. Very small blisters are called vesicles. Larger blisters, like these, are called bullae.

      Bullous pemphigoid - close-up of tense blisters

      illustration

    • Poison ivy on the knee

      Poison ivy on the knee - illustration

      This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the knee. These early lesions consist of multiple small blisters (vesicles), often in a line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The person may then spread the toxin to other areas of the body by scratching.

      Poison ivy on the knee

      illustration

    • Poison ivy on the leg

      Poison ivy on the leg - illustration

      This is a typical early appearance of a poison ivy rash, located on the leg. These early lesions consist of multiple small blisters, often in a line where the skin has brushed against the poison ivy plant. The rash is caused by skin contact with the oily sap (resin) of these plants. The oily resin usually enters the skin rapidly, and is seldom transferred from person to person. The rash is not caused by the fluid from the blisters. Thus, once the person has washed the oil off the skin, the rash is usually not contagious.

      Poison ivy on the leg

      illustration


     

    Review Date: 10/8/2018

    Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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