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EGD discharge

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy - discharge; Upper endoscopy - discharge; Gastroscopy - discharge

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) is a test to examine the lining of the esophagus, stomach, and first part of the small intestine.

When You're in the Hospital

EGD is done with an endoscope. This is a flexible tube with a camera at the end.

During the procedure:

  • You received medicine into a vein (IV).
  • The scope was inserted through the esophagus (food pipe) to the stomach and first part of the small intestine (duodenum). Air was put through the endoscope to make it easier for the doctor to see.
  • If needed, biopsies were taken through the endoscope. Biopsies are tissue samples that are looked at under the microscope.

The test lasted about 5 to 20 minutes.

Right After the Test

You will be taken to an area to recover right after the test. You may wake up and not remember how you got there.

The nurse will check your blood pressure and pulse. Your IV will be removed.

Your doctor will come talk to you and explain the results of the test.

  • Ask to have this information written down, as you may not remember what you were told later on.
  • Final results for any tissue biopsies that were done may take up to 1 to 3 weeks.

Getting Home

Medicines you were given can change the way you think and make it harder to remember for the rest of the day.

As a result, it is NOT safe for you to drive a car or find your own way home.

You will not be allowed to leave alone. You will need to ask a friend or family member to take you home.

Eating and Drinking

You will be asked to wait 30 minutes or more before drinking. Try small sips of water first. When you can do this easily, you can begin with small amounts of solid foods.

You may feel a little bloated from air pumped into your stomach, and burp or pass gas more often over the day.

If your throat is sore, gargle with warm, salty water.

The Rest of the day

DO NOT plan to return to work for the rest of the day. It is not safe to drive or handle tools or equipment.

You should also avoid making important work or legal decisions for the rest of the day, even if you believe your thinking is clear.

Keep an eye on the site where the IV fluids and medicines were given. Watch for any redness or swelling. You can place a warm wet washcloth over the area.

Ask your doctor which medicines or blood thinners you should start taking again and when to take them.

If you had a polyp removed, your health care provider may ask you to avoid lifting and other activities for up to 1 week.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if you have:

  • Black, tarry stools
  • Red blood in your stool
  • Vomiting that will not stop or vomiting blood
  • Severe pain or cramps in your belly
  • Chest pain
  • Blood in your stool for more than 2 bowel movements
  • Chills or fever over 101°F (38.3°C)
  • No bowel movement for more than 2 days

References

DePalma FJ, Elfant AB. Gastrointestinal endoscopy. In: Parrillo JE, Dellinger RP, eds. Critical Care Medicine: Principles of Diagnosis and Management in the Adult. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 17.

Zurad EG. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy. In: Pfenninger JL, Fowler GC, eds. Pfenninger and Fowler's Procedures for Primary Care. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2011:chap 101.


         

        Review Date: 8/1/2017

        Reviewed By: Subodh K. Lal, MD, Gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

        The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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